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Ode to Manual Typewriters

November 6, 2011 , , ,

I love manual typewriters.  I adore the analog beauties for all the reasons contrary to digital word processing.  There exists a revered ceremony, slow mindfulness, and tactile alertness not possible on my iPad or laptop.  Dormant senses suddenly pique like when riding a bike.  I’m plastic and silicon free, baby.

The solid, metal construction stands sturdy, quietly waiting; yet beckoning the pondering poet-writer to pound away. I’m smitten each time I gaze at the beautiful mid-century construction of my 1948 Royal Quiet De Luxe.  It’s ready to go without a power cord or depleting battery.  Analog typewriters are splendid in their single purpose of mechanically transforming human thoughts into a shareable medium from the hard work of its writer.

It’s twelve pounds of writing purity.

The ceremony begins by sitting down in its own space, the special typewriter desk.  The blank piece of paper descends into the black cylinder, resting by the marked paper guide.  Turning the nob emits a wonderful ratcheting sound as the anticipation builds for that just-right margin layout.  Pushing back the paper lock secures the paper and waves the green light for my imagination to unleash.  I relish in slowing down and taking a longer time.

The sound of each typebar hitting the paper is the best!  It’s like a mini-stamp of assertion offset by the sweetly demurring ding at the end of line. That bell chime at each margin end is like a happy hum of a reward for crossing that vast blank paper.  Hitting each key focuses my mind on the letter, number, or symbol, which is about to compose the word that’s part of the grander concept, sentiment or imagery.  A different part of my brain works when using manual typewriters.  The physicality of using an analog typewriter connects me closer to the work.  Each keystroke is a commitment, which cannot be wiped away via pixels.  It’s magnificently manual.

Whoever designed the Roman typewriter typeface is a genius.  Each fat, stocky letter has its own “I’m Here!” presence, delineated by each letter’s equal spacing.  Reviewing the typed paper reveals how each letter has its own personality based on the ink pattern.  It’s no wonder that old school detective shows tie the crook back to the distinct typewriter he used to write the ransom note.  “Egads! That splotchy “a” clearly comes from his 1937 Remington Noiseless.”

Pushing the carriage return arm plays into the entire manual ceremony.  The lack of an erasing ability poses a challenge, quandary or game to the typist.   Using a modern electric typewriter with its eraser is more of an annoyance, which makes me just yearn for the efficient computer.

Imagining how novelists craft hundreds of pages on analog typewriters swells up new appreciation for their technical and creative skills. Check out Life magazine’s black and white gallery of famous writers and their trusty typewriters!

It’s amazing how one passion naturally leads us to discover other gems.  Alan Seaver’s Machines of Loving Grace offers the best site for over 10 typewriter brands, chock full of original manuals over his twenty year collection.  The Chicago-based Letter Writers Alliance has over 1,800 members dedicated to the lost art of letter writing with monthly writing socials.

Calling my local typewriter repairman revealed that he had other three service calls that day.  Are vintage typewriters another hipster trend?  Like all subcultures, a full spectrum of collectors co-exists.  What is actually more common are the raised eyebrows from people when I exult the virtues of manual typewriters.

I don’t need the $500 refurbished retro-cool or bevy of several typewriters. Appreciating the feeling and mechanics of analog typewriters is more of my type.

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comments

There is something cool about the typewriter. We watched “Misery” a while back, and it made think on them again.

They are great. I used to love the sound they made. My problem was when using a larger keyboard layout. I’d hack away at it and then suddenly trap my fingers between the second and top row. Small hands, short fingers. Lots of bad language and bruised knuckles. 🙂

DoF@theinfill

November 8, 2011

These are awesome, gosh typewriters are so nostalgic
love your post

thebigbookofdating

November 8, 2011

Nice. I have an Olivetti Typewriter lettera DL that actually work and has the case. Was made in Spain. Is black and gray. And I love it. ! My uncle used when he was an a college and then he don’t want it and gave to me.

nazarioartpainting

November 8, 2011

A typewriter! This is what I want for Christmas! ❤

Fiona @ lifelyricslemoncake

November 8, 2011

I’ve always loved manual typewriters too.

Peas and Cougars

November 8, 2011

What you seem to be talking about here is a real relationship; a rich one full of love, compassion, responsiveness and predictable rewards. I hope your old green typewriter knows how lucky he (she?) is.

patricemj

November 8, 2011

My parents made me learn to type on a manual typewriter because they thought it would be good for me, but with such small fingers I ended up two-finger typing anyway, so I taught myself on a computer. I’ve rarely used a typewriter, although I have done it, because I have such small hands and it never seemed worth it, since I find my best way to work is fast and edit later.

That said, there is something very ‘romantic’ about writing on a typewriter that makes you feel like you’re doing something historical, like this book you’re writing will be important.

Although I do still have a slight fear of typewriters, after reading Stephen King’s “Misery”. Not that my computer’s much better – my laptop threw the ‘k’ in the middle of a writing sprint the other day and I ended up having to add them all in afterwards, which was very creepy and I found msyself checking for my thumbs….

Miriam Joy

November 8, 2011

This is a cool and interesting post, I love the type fonts and how type wiriters are. I miss thouse, but nowadays you can’t really find them for a good, cheap prize.
Could you tell me where I might be able to try/test one? Oh and where did you get your?
-LilRed
http://www.lilreadwritinghood.wordpress.com

🙂

FearThySeddie13

November 8, 2011

I love ’em too. I’ve got a Smith Corona and Royal. They are my original laptops!

Carrie

November 8, 2011

I love this post! I don’t own a typewriter anymore, but I do love the concrete feel of them in my hands, the permanence, the groundedness they provide. This is not something that can be taken anywhere like a laptop; it requires you to drop anchor, stay put, sit for a spell—-and write, of course!
I loved the way you put it, “It’s magnificently manual.” It is that, indeed. Thanks for a great post!

jamieahughes

November 8, 2011

Nice post !My only memory of a typewriter is during my childhood when I used to visit my Dad’s office and randomly press all the keys in the typewriter. It reminds me of 100 year old typewriter institute in my street…Although the class only has a count of 20+ students now..Whenever I pass through the building the rhythmic sound of people typing away just amazes me …

vandysnape

November 8, 2011

Hahaha! A typewriter! Pretty cool though.

Christian Debbie Cheerilee Alvarez

November 8, 2011

I used to have to type long letters on a typewriter like the one shown. One mistake meant disaster and whiteout. Thanks for sharing. Connie
http://7thandvine.wordpress.com/

conniewalden

November 8, 2011

I love manual typewritters! I’ve been thinking of getting one forever, after reading your post – I think its time! As you say, there is nothing like it! Thanks!
Olivia

4 Rooms and the Moon

November 8, 2011

Love your enthusiasm about the manual typewriter, but as a girl who’s typed on one and who uses a laptop for years, there’s no comparison. The delete key alone is worth trading off. 🙂

http://valentinedefrancis.blogspot.com

valentinedee

November 8, 2011

Congrats on being Freshly Pressed. I too love these old things. They are like old friends.

karyl33

November 8, 2011

Hipster! 😉

natasiarose

November 8, 2011

Great post. I still have my Olivetti, complete with extra ribbons and even white-out ribbons.

I agree there is nothing like the feel of working a mechanical system, but realistically I am much faster on a keyboard and PC than I ever was on a typewriter.

I do like the idea of using it, but these days the very act of typing has changed (grammar, spelling, and style checks). Not to mention most spouses of writers would probably not appreciate a return to the clickety-clack of manual typewriters.

. . . but they are fun for reminiscing.

disperser

November 8, 2011

This is wonderful! I feel every word you have written. I have been looking for a good old-fashioned manual typewriter for years, and my family has a tradition of genuine paper and ink letter writing. Thank you!

Robin

November 8, 2011

Forgot to click on follow-up options. Never would have happened on a typewriter.

Robin

November 8, 2011

An ode to the mighty typewriter. Now that’s a worthy topic about which to write!

John

November 8, 2011

I love it! I had a typewriter when I was very little (like, seven) and I remember being absolutely FASCINATED by it, using it off and on. But somewhere “along the way,” I lost it. I’m married and live on my own now and all I want for Christmas is a typewriter. A genuine, 1900s typewriter (like yours; interesting in selling? kidding!)

And maybe a leather jacket. 😀

Aun Aqui

aunaqui

November 8, 2011

May you get your Christmas wish! It’ll be like being a kid again, but wiser and more stylish with that leather jacket.

phamtazmic

November 11, 2011

Post Muito legal!!

froisbhz

November 8, 2011

“It’s twelve pounds of writing purity.” Truth, my friend. Well said!

The Attic Birds

November 8, 2011

totaly amazing! i love this post and typewriters 🙂

be awake

November 8, 2011

Oh, you make me remember! I love that these beautiful, squat, elegantly simple machines are making a comeback. I learned how to type on a manual in high school back in the old days, was a professional typist during the advent of electrics, then selectrics, and then “memory” typewriters, (ooooh! aaaaah!! we all exclaimed) and I welcomed the arrival of computers with their ease of correction like the second coming. But still, no innovation will ever be able to match that original tactile satisfaction of reaching up to place three fingers on the return arm and sweep the carriage back to the beginning again. It was like dancing…or composing…or playing a musical instrument. I miss that part, I really do.
Have you named your little beast? I always called the one I used in the typing pool “Mr. Edgar.” Thanks for this post…it was lovely!

Dia

November 8, 2011

Reading this post makes me want to get out my grandmother’s old Webster and steal some paper from my printer. I do miss the loud “clack-clack-clack” of a manual typewriter.
Great post! And congratulations on being Freshly Pressed.

kat

November 8, 2011

Your typewriter is rockin! Personally, I think it does have retro-cool.

aquillpen

November 8, 2011

I learnt on manual typewriters years ago at school – I liked the Adlers best (but we never had any Royal typewriters). My friend made me laugh the other day – he’s never used a typewriter in his life but was imitating typing something and when he did the pretend carriage-return I was in hysterics (he is pretty comical anyway 🙂 ). I’m not sure I’d have sufficient ‘finger-smack’ to rap the keys smartly enough on a vintage typewriter any more – I’ve got used to soft-touch keyboards now – love to have a go though 🙂
Carol.

mountaincoward

November 8, 2011

Love this piece…I’ve been on the hunt for a typewriter for a long time now. The urge to get one only became stronger upon reading this:)

bethechangenyc

November 8, 2011

I don’t want to make you jealous, but I still have a pack of 36 ORIGINAL ‘Pegasus’ cleaners for cleaning the type slugs for manual typewriters. They’re glass, about 1.5 inches long, and look dangerously like WW2 cyanide capsules for spies. The German instructions don’t exactly improve the image either. I had my father’s 1965 Olivetti Lettera 32 portable, and that had gone missing, life was not worth living and I entertained the idea for a split second of swallowing one of thoes Pegasus capsules. Thankfully, my Yugoslavia-made Underwood portable helped me change my mind. BTW, I was reared on an Olympia manual office typewriter (with full accents and diacritical marks) and an IBM Selectric Golfball – beauts they were.

thenakedlistener

November 8, 2011

Wow. I am not worthy ;o)

phamtazmic

November 11, 2011

But they DID have an annoying sound.

Andreas Moser

November 8, 2011

That’s a neat typewriter! If you ever would like to spread your stories etc., feel free to email it in to whatsup23.wordpress@yahoo.ca and I can post it on my blog, http://www.whatsup23.wordpress.com.

Quinta

November 8, 2011

How timely; another celebrity writer/commenttor worked exclusively on his typewriter. We lost him this week: Andy Rooney of channel 2’s Sunday night program, Sixty Minutes.
You’re in god company.

Ronnie

I love them too. I have one that works, one that doesn’t and another that doesn’t work even more, but is vast and old and spectacular. I love that they don;t need plugging in. that they have a unique print-as-you-go application that doesn’t need a separate printer. that I think differently and in a livelier more muscular way (something to do with the extremely lively finger action that must be employed).

oslopearl

November 8, 2011

Great post! Your beautiful imagery of sitting down to type on a manual typewriter has made me wish that I owned one too!

Jess

November 8, 2011

Mm, typewriters. I love them so. They make your fingers and your brain work on entirely different levels…

Kaitlin

November 8, 2011

When I was at a thrift store in September I found myself salivating over a Smith Corona typewriter. For a brief moment there I fantasized what it would feel like to return to my roots. See I started out on a clunky non-electric typewriter which I couldn’t master then graduated to an electric typewriter from Sears. Eventually I worked on a word processor then now a laptop. But I share your idealism about the old typewriters.

pnwauthor

November 8, 2011

I bet you can master manual typewriters now. Even the “mistakes” are fun.

phamtazmic

November 11, 2011

I am a graphic designer and a huge fan of typography itself, i have two older sisters one who is a PA to a Company Director and the other is a Court Stenographer. When they were learning their “Trade” the sound of a manual typewriter filled our house with such a beautiful rhythm that it has almost buried it into my subconscious. As a “part time Poet” I wrote many of my first attempts on such wonderful machines, using carbon paper to create copies. Both my sisters loved the manual typewriters they were taught on and often say that the strength in their little fingers is due to the position of the letters “A” and “L” when learning to touch type.

Really nice post, brought back some happy memories. Thanks.

Dave

David Archer

November 8, 2011

I heart graphic design & typography, too! Your family sounds super cool, too.

phamtazmic

November 11, 2011

I agree, manual typewriters are incredible! I have vivd memories of being a small child and being fascinated by the print, the noise…and well, basically everything about it 🙂 I’ll have to get my hands on one again

kalalushop

November 8, 2011

I remember learning how to type on an even older one my Grandfather had, the same one my Momma learned on. And the fond memories of the sound and feel of putting my thoughts to paper on my own 🙂 Even though I have become accustomed to the easy of computer keys I must admit at times I long for the sound of feel of a real machine like that from time to time.

hcmason

November 8, 2011

The sound of each typebar hitting the paper is the best! —>>> I also feel the same. Manual typewriters are vintage, and vintage is cool!!!

Irwan Juanda

November 8, 2011

🙂

pinayateista

November 8, 2011

Hi, im a writer too and I like old fashion typewriters. It was good enough for Stephen King, so is good enough for me 🙂

oliviaashewriter

November 8, 2011

i love the line “It’s twelve pounds of writing purity”.. because its so true.. great post.. 😀

abichica

November 8, 2011

Aw, shucks. Thank you.

phamtazmic

November 11, 2011

Your clarity of writing is exquisitely reinforced by your composition and inclusion of perfect photos. It makes me want to get my hands on my old manual typewriter (which sadly, long ago, went the way of the brachiosaurus).

lifeisallmovingparts

November 8, 2011

You’ve left a treasure of a comment. You sound like bona fide writer. Thank you!

phamtazmic

November 11, 2011

I, sadly, have never used a manual typewriter before, but I find the sound of it really comforting too. I wish I own one ^_^

Day I Started Reading

November 8, 2011

Here’s mine 🙂
It’s a pink 1950’s Royal.
I bought it off eBay, then had it tuned up at a local typewriter shop.
I’ve been using it to write my NaNoWriMo novel, as well as type free poems for people!

b r

November 8, 2011

More power to you! I like your blog, too. Keep rockin’ it.

phamtazmic

November 11, 2011

so classic, so beautiful

LELASURAMADU LOVES CATFISH

November 8, 2011

We have a number of typewriters here, two within sight of my desk. I had terrible handwriting in grade school and discovered the family Royal. Teachers were critical of my discovery!!! It was invented in Milwaukee and the Museum there has a wonderful collection.

Bill

William Lewis

November 8, 2011

Great post. Definitely an interesting read.

NHL 12 tips, strategies, information and team reviews at…

NHL-Tips.com

mattthomas44

November 8, 2011

I love these typewriters! I have a couple on my attic now…it’s so sad. And to think we had to practice over and over for finger placement…and now my kids type faster than me with their thumbs, no less.

Cheryl McNulty

November 8, 2011

Sweet. I sound that way when I talk about the joys of writing long hand on a legal pad — preferably with a fountain pen. Barring that I’d love a typewriter over a computer keyboard; but I must admit I’m more of a Selectric girl…

yogaleigh

November 8, 2011

Oh the feeling beneath your fingers! I remember doing freelance articles on a box of Associated Press wire service paper for a continuous typefest.

Lou De La Foret

November 9, 2011

Wow, I really liked this… I’m a writer and started out with an analog travelling typewriter I found in a second hand shop, sadly I only write on my laptop these days. But after have read this beautiful text I might just go and buy a lovely little machine! Great inspiration.

Michael Faun

Michael Faun

November 9, 2011

I bet your typing joys will flood back! Go for it, Michael.

phamtazmic

November 11, 2011

Even i like the typewriter, the style the way. It is a unique innovation.

richannkur

November 9, 2011

Beautiful. Unfortunately, “single purpose” seems to be a thing of the past in these weird times in which a phone, a computer and a navigation device are all the same. Analog beauty was definitely “splendid in it’s single purpose”ness. Thank you for this wonderful reminder.

שירלי קליביצקי

November 9, 2011

I still have my Adler Gabriele 32, essentially a re-badged Royal from the early 1980s. Last generation manual typewriter. Whole different sort of writing tool from a computer. Fantastic. Great post & thanks!

Matthew Wright
http://mjwrightnz.wordpress.com
http://www.matthewwright.net

Matthew Wright

November 9, 2011

Beautifully written post! . . . Really enjoyed it! Thank you for sharing, and congratulations on being “Freshly Pressed”!!

http://arabianmusings.wordpress.com/

Michele La Morte-Shbat

November 9, 2011

When my children saw a manual typewriter, the first question they asked was: Where is the monitor?. It was hilarious!

Sandeep Bhalla

November 9, 2011

hi, do you want to see my typewriters?
occultoantonio.wordpress.com

occultoantonio

November 9, 2011

I love typewriters. My friend has one. I used it once and said, “I want a typewriter!” They are seriously cool.

Sophia Morgan (griffinspen)

November 9, 2011

Seriously been thinking about rummaging some antique stores for “the real thing”…really appreciate how you broke down the ceremony. Merci!

whenquiet

November 9, 2011

You are so right. But, more than that, I love pen and paper, to carry with me wherever I go. We live in a real world, not a virtual one, and I like how *real* in some sort of way things like old-fashioned typewriters or writing with pen and paper are.

sabreseye

November 9, 2011

Typewriters might be out of the market but it will always be in style in my heart-where my emotions will flow through.

Aliza Carillo

November 9, 2011

Your typewritten words are pure poetry…I could hear each letter and symbol click as you pressed your finger down then the comforting slap of the typebar against the paper…sweet music…
This past weekend I “picked” a 1930’s Toledo Metal Furniture Company mint condition typewriter table…I am hooked on vintage metal and a vintage typewritter would be the perfect addition to my growing collection.

jeanne

November 9, 2011

oh man you just made me want to purchase a typewriter even more! i always wanted one and I was going to reward myself for when I move out into my own solo apartment near or in nyc but now i’m reconsidering it hehe. Or you know what, i’ll use this as an impetus to get a job quicker. thanks! this was a great article!

intervital

November 9, 2011

NYC is one favorite cities of all time! May the Job Wizards bring you only the best! Brooklyn flea markets!

phamtazmic

November 11, 2011

I agree manual typewriters possess more beauty than our modern gadgets no matter how sleek and compact but I would probably only use one for idle writing. For someone who has deadlines to meet, it’s inefficient. Slowing down and taking a long time is not an option for some unfortunately.

leadinglight

November 9, 2011

they are amazing! I only have one so far, but I’ve got my eye on a few. Amazing for a bit of crafting, too xxxx

Betty Amazing

November 9, 2011

Beautiful piece. Cuts to the core of any writer who has learned the craft while clacking along on a Royal or an Underwood. Great post. I blog to writers too at http://www.thewritersrefuge.wordpress.com. It’s a blog designed to inspire writers to chase their dreams.

Jim Magruder

November 9, 2011

Not sure we’ve surpassed the portable non-electric typewriter yet. It was sustainable. It was space-saving. It had its own printer included. Our home office sure takes up a lot more space than this.

panoptika

November 9, 2011

I think this is a gem. I was always fascinated by how fast my father could type on these manual works of art! Thanks for good memories.

Morris A.

November 9, 2011

I LOVE TYPEWRITERS! I own a beautiful orangy-red Elite manual typewriter that I love to little bits. I named her “Rose Madder” after my favorite book by my favorite author (Stephen King). I feel so much more inspired when I write on her than when I do on computer. I definitely agree that a different part of your mind works when you write on a manual typewriter than on the computer. I especially love making hand-made indie zines, and it’s always a fun challenge to do it on the typewriter. Thanks for the wonderful post ❤

hadass420

November 9, 2011

My grandmother still owns an old manual typewriter similar to the once pictured here. What it lacks in convenience, it definitely makes up for in character! Now I’m wondering if it has much antique value…

Melissa Barlow (@mcbarlow36)

November 9, 2011

I love them too. This is funny, yesterday I was talking to my husband about my love for that same model that you describe and he told me: “Isn’t it funny that now we need electrical connections, a monitor, a tower, and a printer to do what that thing did?” Of course computers are used now for much more than writing but you get the point.

inkspeare

November 9, 2011

It’s been years since I used a typewriter. You’ve made me want to pick one up again

Elaine

November 9, 2011

Wow! You *almost* make me want to ditch my Netbook, and go to a local flea market to purchase one of these beauties!

(The idea of sending out hand-typed letters of encouragement, etc. is particularly alluring.)

Lady Tam Li

November 9, 2011

Your Royal is beautiful! Very well written post…I can still hear the clicking of the typebars and the little ding…I have two antiques myself in storage. I must get them out again I’m so inspired!

apartments i like

November 9, 2011

just twist and type.. the world is your ribbon. spin on you crazy devil!

gavigrapevine

November 9, 2011

“Slow mindfulness, and tactile alertness”–absolutely! Sometimes I feel like I am the ONLY person who still writes everything out by hand first. Words just flows out of me much more organically. But there is something to be said about spell check and font simplicity…

hangryhippo

November 9, 2011

I want one of these so badly! I found one that had missing keys at a thrift store, but I want to use it…so missing and broken keys didn’t do it for me…considering I know nothing about repairing these things… I’ll keep looking though…despite that my newlywed husband thinks I don’t need it!

melissashipman

November 9, 2011

I recently met a man who has been selling manual typing machines for the last 40 years. Last week I wrote his story in my blog, but it is written in Spanish. If you can read it, I think you can have a good time. Here is the link: http://seiscientas.wordpress.com/2011/11/07/cuando-se-aporreaban-las-teclas/

paulazubiaur

November 9, 2011

Great article. I personally feel saticifation in hitting the plastic blocks that make up my keyboard, but hey – as long as it can write, it works for me 🙂

TheOriginalBURP

November 9, 2011

I couldn’t agree more. There is nothing I know of, when if comes to putting ink on paper, that equals the visceral feel of a manual typewriter. the intimate and immediate sensation I got from them led me to search for even simulated sounds on a computer word processor. The experience only left me wanting the old hardware even more.
Thanks for bringing back the memories.

randypgibbs

November 9, 2011

In the 60s, I learned to type on a manual typewriter with ‘blank’ keys (there was a poster on the wall showing which letters were on which keys; you NEVER looked down when you were typing). Years later I was introduced to the IBM Selectric (which became a favourite of mine because you could switch out the ‘ball’ and use different fonts for different purposes) and I thought it was a wonder! Word processing (typing on computers in general) doesn’t have the same visceral feel as those old machines – typewriters give you more of a sense of accomplishment when you’re writing, because you hear every letter hitting the paper and you know exactly when you’ve reached the end of a line. And with a manual, of course, you don’t have to worry about electricity (never mind battery life). Great post!

Margo Karolyi

November 9, 2011

I am a writer, and I do wholeheartedly put the invention of the word processor up there with sliced bread and washing machines…

But, that being said, I adore my teal-green Olivetti manual typewriter that I bought for myself when I was a wee 17 year old (I’d been getting writer’s cramp!). Started typing my work then (including journal entries) and never went back to writing them out free hand. I can key board in my sleep, upside down, and probably in water, if I could just find a keyboard that functions in water. I have a few friends who can’t keyboard to save their lives, and I am filled with pity watching them hunt and peck in front of their computers…

Does it matter whether we write what we write with pen and paper, typewriter, or word processor? Some feel passionately that it does.

I think that’s all a bunch of nonsense, and that those who need to write, find a way to write–even if that means scratching words on sand with a stick!

wellcraftedtoo

November 9, 2011

Ah, the old typewriter. I love it.
However, the one I had was with Arabic letters as I used to write only in Arabic back then. But with all the features the simple word processor has, computers are irreplaceable.
I guess.

IM_Author_of_TheDetour.info

November 9, 2011

Ah, the old typewriter. I love it.
However, the one I had was with Arabic letters as I used to write only in Arabic back then. But with all the features the simple word processor has, computers are irreplaceable.
I guess.

IM_Author_of_TheDetour.info

November 9, 2011

PS Really like the design of your site/blog!

wellcraftedtoo

November 9, 2011

Oh, the comments are thrown at the end. Interesting way of arranging the blog.

IM_Author_of_TheDetour.info

November 9, 2011

Great post! I love the manual typewriter (had one as a kid), but I must admit it’s for nostalgia’s sake. I would miss the speed and and ease of my laptop if I had to go back. =)

uravnrep

November 9, 2011

Oh I love it so much!! I get RSVPs to events from older invitees who type their response on the return card. I love them so much I put them up on my bulletin board! Oh to get my hands on a typewriter…

leschaef

November 9, 2011

Love this! I recently made a mixed media sculpture out of a printer’s type case for the Museum of Printing in North Andover, MA. My theme was inspired by the typewriter and paid homage to Hemingway’s famous quote, “There is nothing to writing. All you do is sit down at a typewriter and bleed.” You can check it out at the following link: http://wp.me/p1hiIP-jm

K E R N girl

November 9, 2011

It is sad Manual Typewriters are saying farewell to this world. For several decades they dutifully brought communication and literature to the world, provided employment to millions of people and served human community from anywhere in this world where there is no electricity or other power. The Typewriting Institutes also are saying farewell. Our young girls have nowhere else to go to learn this skill from. Government offices, other establishments and homes are packing away the typewriters in their possession as they are replaced by computers. But wait, do not sell them. We will need them again in the very near future. Before this century is a quarter parts over, we are going to face acute power shortage. Computers and other such gadgets won’t work and we will have to call manual Typewriters back into service. But alas, the last Typewriter factory in the world was closed in India in the year 2011. It was owned by Godrej.

P.S.Remesh Chandran

November 9, 2011

I still have my Smith Corona which I used in college to type papers others and make money. It was high tech back then!

Congrats on being Freshly Pressed!

Lonnie

November 9, 2011

enjoyed reading this 🙂

mariawriter

November 9, 2011

I love this–and so very true!!

Hanna Maze

November 9, 2011

It is impossible for someone who has used a computer since he was 3 to imagine why anyone would want the inefficiency of a manual typewriter. I’ve only heard rumors of these machines, yet your writing makes these clunky, archaic, inefficient machines sound amazing. Your words are so elegant and tie together so beautifully, I will be coming back for more.

planetzuda

November 10, 2011

Your kind words made my heart smile. Thank you!

phamtazmic

November 11, 2011

i still have my typewriter, from where i have learned typing

nipun

November 10, 2011

I also love old typewriters. To me, the sound of those keys going pitter patter is the best sound in the world.

thebabelblog

November 10, 2011

i am seventeen and i write all my stories on an old typewriter. It’s an amazing feeling. People don’t tend to understand. If you have a laptop why use a typewriter? There is just something magical about it all really. Beautiful.
My best friend and i also write letters to each other and send them by post. I wish more people could see the beauty in little things like that.

becausemydear

November 11, 2011

hmm…true..I agree….good post
even better: going to back to good old pen and paper…
or like our forefathers lets write on stones and boulders for the future generations to read and prosper…..:)

Pommi

November 11, 2011

Barun Jha

November 11, 2011

I had a 1957 Royal that I carried all over the world. It lasted through almost 20 years of hard use and little maintenance. And it always worked when the electric service went out.

mohanmohan

November 11, 2011

i liked your post. i just procured myself an olympia sm-9 and, i too, feel the love for manual typewriters now =)

who

November 12, 2011

You have many talents. I am amased as usual with you.

uncle Chuck

November 12, 2011

my dad made me learn touch typing. all my sisters knew how so i had to know to. he gave me a typing book and i had to spend one hour a day to learn and type away. i really hated it at first but i began to love it in college when i churned out my papers faster than anyone else. years later, i joyfully taught touch typing every semester in a small provincial school. my students have gone on to their respective careers but all of us share one thing – we don’t need to look at the keyboard when typing. i thank my dad for his persistence and the old typewriter back home and for the daily hour i spent honing this skill that benefits me up to today.

innotechmanila

November 12, 2011

very inspiring post. please visit my blog and have your say. 🙂 This is my latest post http://thebrightoldoak.wordpress.com/2011/11/12/introducing-carlo-stuparich/

thebrightoldoak

November 14, 2011

The tick tick tick tick tick tick DING, zippp of a typewriter brings back warm memories of a simpler time-of my youth.
It brings back memories of black and white movies, Clark Kent, old tv shows, Sitting in typing class staring at the cute girl four desks down. Getting the keys stuck together because I hit two keys at the same time and then having ribbon ink all the way up to my armpit trying to fix the darn thing because the ribbon decided to bunch up.
I love the way you wrote. It felt like someone describing an old friend.

A typewriter repairman? really? Those still exist? I picture someone with suspenders, with the shirt sleeves rolled up to the elbows,in the middle of a room filled with old typewriters smelling of old ink , grease and 3-in-1 oil. Hunched over a desk lit by a forty watt bulb. working,like a surgeon on his patient, on an old typewriter trying to keep it alive.

Great post! Thanks!

sixtywhiskers

December 11, 2011

Yes, I’ve seen Kasbah’s refurbs on Fab, too. I’ve found my more affordable goodies on eBay. Thanks for sharing, and I hope you have a treasure of your own!

phamtazmic

March 27, 2012

2 notes

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